News

April 2017

Why is the MCC process for conducting exams changing?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, our nation’s medical professionals’ competencies must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and students.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine is continued to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations and aligning them to our new Blueprint;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

Updates to the Objectives for the Qualifying Examinations
Revisions to the MCC’s Objectives: With the upcoming changes to the Blueprint for the Medical Council of Canada’s Qualifying Examinations starting in 2018, the following revisions have been made to the MCC’s Objectives. The Objectives describe the attributes expected of medical graduates entering supervised and independent practice in Canada, and can be used by candidates preparing for MCC examinations as well as by educators and medical assessment organizations in Canada and around the world.

Revisions to the MCC’s Objectives: With the upcoming changes to the Blueprint for the Medical Council of Canada’s Qualifying Examinations starting in 2018, the following revisions have been made to the MCC’s Objectives. The Objectives describe the attributes expected of medical graduates entering supervised and independent practice in Canada, and can be used by candidates preparing for MCC examinations as well as by educators and medical assessment organizations in Canada and around the world.

The Objectives serve as MCC’s guide when developing questions for the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE), the National Assessment Collaboration (NAC) examination and the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part I and Part II.

Why are we doing this?

  • Revisions to the MCC Objectives ensure that they are aligned with the newly approved examination blueprints.


Detailed information on the Blueprint project can be found here

How are the MCC Objectives developed?

The Objectives are organized by physician role as defined by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons’ CanMEDS (Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists) framework. This includes the roles of communicator, collaborator, health advocate, leader/manager, scholar, professional and medical expert. The CanMEDS framework is used extensively in Canada and is recognized worldwide.

Using the Objectives as a study guide

The Objectives are also organized by clinical presentation and diagnoses, each with learning objectives that set out what is expected of a Canadian physician. When preparing for the MCC Qualifying Examination, each role and clinical presentation/diagnosis can be reviewed with a careful read of the related key and enabling objectives.

To assist you in identifying the specific revisions made to the MCC Objectives, we have consolidated several tracking lists for your information. The lists have been separated into the following three categories: New Objectives, Revised Objectives and Deleted Objectives.

New Results Release Dates for MCCQE Part I and for the MCCQE Part II—Effective 2018
New MCCQE Part I and MCCQE Part II results release dates will take effect in 2018: Please be advised that for the spring 2018 MCCQE Part I, the planned results date will be in July 2018; for the fall 2018 MCCQE Part II, the results release will be in January 2019.

New MCCQE Part I and MCCQE Part II results release dates will take effect in 2018: Please be advised that for the spring 2018 MCCQE Part I, the planned results date will be in July 2018; for the fall 2018 MCCQE Part II, the results release will be in January 2019.

Why are we doing this?

  • The new results release dates are linked to the launch of the new exams, and the time and attention required to conduct and complete a full standard-setting exercise following each exam.


Impact:

  • In some cases, postgraduate programs require their incoming residents to provide MCCQE Part I results. For those programs who have this requirement, please be advised of the change in timing for the planned results release for the spring 2018 MCCQE Part I (to July 2018), in order to reorient or change the timeline of this requirement for this session.

  • Candidates who are planning on taking the fall 2018 MCCQE Part II should be aware of the change in timing for the release of their results, especially if they must submit their results to other medical organizations before the end of 2018.

Publication of Test Specifications for the MCCQE Part II
Test Specifications for the MCCQE Part II: Following the publication of MCCQE Part I test specifications, the specifications for the MCCQE Part II have been posted, detailing the content weightings across the two Blueprint categories: physician activities and dimensions of care.

Test Specifications for the MCCQE Part II: Following the publication of MCCQE Part I test specifications, the specifications for the MCCQE Part II have been posted, detailing the content weightings across the two Blueprint categories: physician activities and dimensions of care.

Of note: The test specifications will refer to content weightings for the MCCQE Part I starting in spring 2018, and content weightings for the MCCQE Part II starting in fall 2018.

Additional Announcements
MCC Business Session at CCME: Monday, May 1, 2017 in Winnipeg, Manitoba: The MCC is proud to take part in the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). CCME attendees are encouraged to attend the MCC’s Business Session on Monday, May 1 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. (local time/CST) at the Delta Hotel (Charleswood B Room) for the latest Assessment Evolution information and updates.

MCC Business Session at CCME: Monday, May 1, 2017 in Winnipeg, Manitoba: The MCC is proud to take part in the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). CCME attendees are encouraged to attend the MCC’s Business Session on Monday, May 1 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. (local time/CST) at the Delta Hotel (Charleswood B Room) for the latest Assessment Evolution information and updates.

Please extend this invitation to registered and prospective CCME attendees.

On Monday, May 1, 2017, we invite you to attend our business session, titled: The times they are a’changing. In this session, we will be reviewing the following topics:

  • Upcoming changes to the MCC's exam program and the communications activities that will support this evolution;

  • Previewing our new candidate score reports; and

  • Reviewing the results of the university pilot activity of the new multiple-choice question tests.


We will also be highlighting the existing candidate orientation tools and will discuss the additional preparatory materials that will be available.

MCC Speakers:

  • Dr. Ian Bowmer, Executive Director

  • Ms. Jessica Hertzog-Grenier, Director of Communications

  • Dr. André De Champlain, Director of Psychometrics and Assessment Services

  • Ms. Ingrid De Vries, Associate Director of the Evaluation Bureau


Date/Time: Monday, May 1, 2017 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. (local time/CST)

Location: Delta Hotel, Charleswood B Room

March 2017

Why is the MCC process for conducting exams changing?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, our nation’s medical professionals’ competencies must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and students.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine is continued to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations and aligning them to our new Blueprint;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

 

March 2017 Announcements: Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part I and its delivery in 2018
Exam delivery by MCC will continue to take place at current sites in 2018, and broaden in 2019 when we move to a vendor-delivered model: It will continue to be business as usual with exam delivery continuing at faculty and some private sites in 2018. We plan to introduce the vendor-delivered model in all Canadian cities where the examination is currently delivered, and internationally starting in spring 2019.

Exam delivery by MCC will continue to take place at current sites in 2018, and broaden in 2019 when we move to a vendor-delivered model: It will continue to be business as usual with exam delivery continuing at faculty and some private sites in 2018. We plan to introduce the vendor-delivered model in all Canadian cities where the examination is currently delivered, and internationally starting in spring 2019.

Why are we doing this?

  • This will ensure continuity in the short term and ensure broad access for candidates, especially for the spring examination window, when most candidates take the MCCQE Part I.

  • In 2019, the shift to a vendor-delivered model will provide more opportunities to take the MCCQE Part I.

Changes to the candidate exam experience starting in 2018 include:
A longer multiple-choice component, language selection at the start of the exam, and the ability to flag questions during the multiple-choice component and return to those questions at any point during the multiple-choice component portion of the exam.

A longer multiple-choice component, language selection at the start of the exam, and the ability to flag questions during the multiple-choice component and return to those questions at any point during the multiple-choice component portion of the exam.

The new exam structure will see a longer multiple-choice component (four hours) and a shorter clinical decision making component (3.5 hours). Currently, candidates have 3.5 hours to complete the multiple-choice component portion of the exam, and four hours for the clinical decision making component.

Why are we doing this?

  • The multiple-choice component portion was increased to be able to test more competencies in the required content areas.


Candidates will be required to make their language choice at the start of their exam on exam day, and then take the exam in one language; the language choice cannot be changed throughout the exam, and the toggling feature between English and French questions during the exam will no longer be available.

Why are we doing this?

  • Our analyses showed minimal usage of the toggling feature by candidates.

  • This change is also based on input from stakeholders, including medical educators, who have asked that their candidates take the exam in a single language.

  • The introduction of enhanced quality assurance measures for both language versions of the examination has made the need to toggle obsolete.

  • As well, the time spent toggling between language versions presented a potential risk for candidates of not completing the examination.

  • We are introducing this change in 2018, to align with how the exam will be offered at vendor operated sites in 2019.


Candidates will have the ability to flag questions during the multiple-choice question component, and return to those questions at any point during the multiple-choice question portion of the exam. As is currently the case, candidates will continue to be able to flag clinical decision making (CDM) questions and go back to the flagged CDM items at any point during the CDM component of the exam.

Why are we doing this?

  • This is being done to enhance the exam experience for candidates and align with how the exam will be delivered by the vendor starting in 2019.


 

March 2017: Additional Announcements
Limits to number of exam attempts for MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018: As you may be aware, limits will be introduced to the number of times candidates can take the MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018.

Limits to number of exam attempts for MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018: As you may be aware, limits will be introduced to the number of times candidates can take the MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018.

Beginning in January 2018, candidates may apply and take the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I and Part II a maximum of four times each. A one-year waiting period will be required between the third and fourth attempts. After four attempts, in exceptional personal circumstances, the candidate can request that the Central Examination Committee (CEC) grant them special permission to make a fifth attempt.

Exam attempts before 2018 will not count towards the limit; the count starts in 2018. If candidates receive a result of “no standing” because, for example, they fell ill during the exam, this will not count as an attempt. However, failing or a status of “denied standing” will be considered attempts.

This policy, put forward by the MCC’s Central Examination Committee (CEC) and approved by the Council last September, ensures fairness for candidates who are unlikely to be successful after numerous exam attempts, and prevents undue content exposure.