News

October 2017

Why is the MCC making changes to the examinations?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices. 

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices. 

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, the competencies of our nation’s medical professionals must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and learners.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine continues to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations to align with our new Blueprint and to better address population health issues and psychosocial aspects of care;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials, including modules, videos, orientation and preparatory examinations for convenient online access anytime, anywhere.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

Coming in January 2018 – launch of the new practice tests for MCCQE Part I (formerly referred to as “Self-Administered Examinations”/SAEs)
Practice tests offer candidates the opportunity to test their level of preparedness for the MCCQE Part I. These tests are designed to familiarize candidates with the look and feel of the MCCQE Part I, and the types of questions they could encounter. Practice test content will align as much as possible with the MCCQE Part I Blueprint and content weightings.

Practice tests offer candidates the opportunity to test their level of preparedness for the MCCQE Part I. These tests are designed to familiarize candidates with the look and feel of the MCCQE Part I, and the types of questions they could encounter. Practice test content will align as much as possible with the MCCQE Part I Blueprint and content weightings.

About the new practice tests:

  • Starting in January 2018, three Multiple-Choice Questions (MCQ) test forms will be available for purchase - each with 100 MCQ questions

  • Practice test content is created by physicians and experts who have experience with the MCC’s content development process

  • A new Practice Test Portal offering many user-friendly features will also be launched to enable anytime, anywhere access for test takers to sign up for practice tests and take the test to completion

  • Test takers will be able to self-manage their access to MCC practice tests. They may view their test history, including their results from previous practice test attempts

  • All test takers will have the opportunity to provide feedback on their practice test experience via an online survey. Our aim is to enhance the practice test experience based on this valuable input. Organizations can also self-manage their practice test account – request quotes, purchase access codes, manage access codes, etc.


What benefit do practice tests provide?

  • The practice tests are intended to familiarize candidates with the MCCQE Part I and provide information to test takers that may help them focus their studies


Practice test results:

  • Practice test results will be immediately available, and will provide overall performance information in relation to the new Blueprint, showing the 4x4 grid with the number of correct answers per cell


Cost:

  • For Test Takers: The cost will be $100 for each test form. There is no limit to the number of test forms that can be purchased.


Stay tuned to mccevolution.ca for the new Practice Test Portal link, which will be made available in January 2018.

New exam score ranges will be implemented in spring 2018 for MCCQE Part I
Please be advised that new exam score ranges will be implemented next year and will appear different than exam score ranges used for past sessions.

Please be advised that new exam score ranges will be implemented next year and will appear different than exam score ranges used for past sessions.

The current scale for both MCCQE Part I and MCCQE Part II is from 50 to 950. The new scale for MCCQE Part I will be from 100 to 400, and the new scale for MCCQE Part II will be from 50 to 250.

New exam score ranges are being developed to reflect best practices. An independent review of the new exam score ranges was conducted by the Central Examination Committee, responsible for the quality of content and exams, and comprised of the Chairs of all test committees for the MCCQE Part I and Part II.

How to compare scores with the new exam score ranges:

The manner in which scores can be compared remains consistent for both the former and new exam score ranges—that is, scores can be compared to the mean and standard deviation of total scores using results from when the new exam score range is established (spring 2018 for MCCQE Part I and fall 2018 for MCCQE Part II).

Timing overview:

  • New exam score ranges will be implemented in spring 2018 for the MCCQE Part I and fall 2018 for the MCCQE Part II.

  • New MCCQE Part I and MCCQE Part II results release dates will take effect in 2018/2019:For the spring 2018 MCCQE Part I, the MCC plans on releasing results in late June or early July 2018; for the fall 2018 MCCQE Part II, results will be released in January 2019.

  • The new results release dates are linked to the launch of the new exams, and the time and attention required to conduct and complete a full standard-setting exercise following each exam.

Eligibility Changes to the NAC Examination
A reminder that the MCC is making changes to its examination program in 2018 and 2019 to reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians. As part of this transition, the NAC Examination eligibility criteria are changing to provide candidates with more flexibility and enhanced access to the examination.

A reminder that the MCC is making changes to its examination program in 2018 and 2019 to reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians. As part of this transition, the NAC Examination eligibility criteria are changing to provide candidates with more flexibility and enhanced access to the examination.

The following changes will be introduced with the March 2018 session:

The MCCEE is no longer an eligibility requirement to apply to the NAC exam

International medical students and graduates are no longer required to pass the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) before they can apply to the NAC exam. Eligible candidates can challenge the NAC exam first – or the MCCEE – in the order that they prefer and can even apply to both at once.

Candidates can retake the NAC exam if they have a pass (or fail) result, for up to three attempts in total

Previously, only candidates who had failed the exam could retake it. Now, candidates with a pass are also able to retake it. The candidate’s latest result will be the only valid result and will not expire.

Candidates taking the exam will have to skip a session before reapplying. For example, a candidate taking the September 2018 NAC exam will be able to retake the exam, at the earliest, in September 2019, skipping the March 2019 session. This change will be applied moving forward, starting with those taking the March 2018 session. Candidates who took the September 2017 exam will still be able to retake it in March 2018, if they so choose.

International medical students may take the NAC exam within 12 months of their anticipated date of graduation

Previously, students could challenge the NAC exam in September of their final medical school year, further to passing the MCCEE.

The NAC exam may now be the first assessment that international medical students challenge, instead of the MCCEE. As such, the requirement of taking the NAC exam at the earliest within 12 months of the anticipated date of graduation was made explicit in the exam’s regulations.

This requirement does not apply to medical graduates who may apply to the exam at any time as they have already completed their medical degree.

See NAC exam Application and eligibility for more information.

September 2017

WEBINAR: The new MCC Qualifying Examination Part I: What’s in it for me?
The following webinar titled The new MCC Qualifying Examination Part I: What’s in it for me? was conducted on September 7, 2017. Please click here to view this presentation and question and answer session.

The following webinar titled The new MCC Qualifying Examination Part I: What’s in it for me? was conducted on September 7, 2017. Please click here to view this presentation and question and answer session.

It is designed for third-year or final year medical students who will be challenging the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination in Spring 2018.

Presentation Title: The new MCC Qualifying Examination Part I: What’s in it for me?

Speaker: Dr. Claire Touchie, MD, MHPE, FRCPC , Chief Medical Education Advisor, Medical Council of Canada; Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Ottawa

Presentation: 20 minutes
Question and answer session: 20 minutes

If you have questions regarding upcoming examination changes, please visit our FAQs section or email your question to communications@mcc.ca at any time to receive a response.

August 2017

Invitation – Webinar: The new MCC Qualifying Examination Part I: What’s in it for me? (Thursday, September 7, 2017)
Do you want to find out more about the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination that you will be challenging in Spring 2018? Are you a third-year or final year medical student? Then this webinar is for you!

Do you want to find out more about the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination that you will be challenging in Spring 2018? 

Are you a third-year or final year medical student? Then this webinar is for you!

INVITATION:
For the following webinar: The new MCC Qualifying Examination Part I: What’s in it for me?

Thursday, September 7, 2017
English webinar: 12:00 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. ET

Speaker:
Dr. Claire Touchie, MD, MHPE, FRCPC
Chief Medical Education Advisor, Medical Council of Canada
Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Ottawa

INSTRUCTIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE WEBINAR:
No advance registration is required.

The webinar link will be activated on Thursday, September 7 at 8 a.m. ET [it is not currently activated].

On Thursday, September 7:
We encourage you to test your access to the webinar link in advance (an extra set-up step may be required for some participants).

Please go to: mcc-cmc.adobeconnect.com/webinar (to be activated Sept. 7 at 8 a.m. ET)
Please enter as “Guest”.

To download the free Adobe App, click here

Browser selection:
Edge™ and Explorer™ browsers are suggested.

If you use the Chrome™ browser, an extra step is required for compatibility with Adobe Connect. Please click here for instructions to make the Chrome™ browser compatible with Adobe Connect™.

If you are located in Ottawa, Canada and would like to attend the webinar in person, here are the details:
University of Ottawa
Roger Guindon Pavillon, Room RGN 2005
451 Smyth Road
Ottawa

Please note that seating will be available on a first-come basis.

Question and answer session with Dr. Claire Touchie, Medical Council of Canada:
We invite you to ask questions during the question and answer segment of the webinar that will follow Dr. Touchie’s presentation. Instructions on how to submit a question will be provided to webinar participants during the webinar.

Questions at any time about MCC examination changes can be sent to communications@mcc.ca.

Technical support:
Adobe technical specialists are available to assist you at 1-800-422-3623. (Canada, United States, Mexico). For additional international telephone #s for technical support, please click here.

This webinar will be recorded and available for viewing after September 7 on our mccevolution.ca website at www.mccevolution.ca/resources/news/.

Information will also be posted in the Assessment Evolution e-bulletin. Click here to be added to the Assessment Evolution e-bulletin distribution list.

Webinar Project Manager, Medical Council of Canada: wcumming@mcc.ca

July 2017

Why is the MCC making changes to the examinations?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices.

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices. 

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, the competencies of our nation’s medical professionals must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and learners.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine continues to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations to align with our new Blueprint and to better address population health issues and psychosocial aspects of care;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials, including modules, videos, orientation and preparatory examinations for convenient online access anytime, anywhere.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

Enhancements to the NAC Examination: Standard-setting exercise will coincide with the March 2019 exam session
Enhancements are being made to the National Assessment Collaboration (NAC) Examination. There will be a standard-setting exercise following the first implementation of the new enhanced NAC exam in the March 2019 exam session. Enhancements to the exam are part of the MCC’s and the NAC’s commitment to ensuring that current best practices in assessment are integrated into examination development and delivery.

Enhancements are being made to the National Assessment Collaboration (NAC) Examination. There will be a standard-setting exercise following the first implementation of the new enhanced NAC exam in the March 2019 exam session. Enhancements to the exam are part of the MCC’s and the NAC’s commitment to ensuring that current best practices in assessment are integrated into examination development and delivery.

The purpose of the NAC exam

Each year, international medical graduates (IMGs) from approximately 100 countries involving over 400 international medical schools take the NAC Examination, which assesses the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to enter postgraduate training in Canada. The NAC exam is overseen by the NAC Examination Committee (NEC) which is comprised of physicians and experts in medical education and assessment.

What is standard setting?

Standard setting is a process used to define an acceptable level of performance in the domains assessed by an examination.

How MCC will continue to guide stakeholders through the NAC standard-setting exercise and outcomes

Residency programs/medical educators: Guidelines will be provided on how to interpret changes to the reporting of candidate results following the 2019 standard-setting exercise.

Candidates: Those taking the March 2019 NAC exam session will be the first cohort to experience the enhanced exam and receive results following the standard-setting exercise. The MCC and the NAC will provide information resources to help candidates interpret the new score scale, including an updated Supplementary Information Report, and updated content on the NAC exam Scoring page on mcc.ca.

Please be advised that in the sessions when standard setting is done, the extra steps to complete the exercise require a delay in the date of the results release. In the case of the NAC exam, the impact is anticipated to be minimal as the timing of the standard-setting exercise will still allow candidates to receive results well in advance of the opening of the 2020 CaRMS R-1 Main Residency Match process.

We invite your questions and comments, and we will continue to keep you informed about key developments every step of the way.

June 2017

Why is the MCC making changes to the examinations?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices.

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices.

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, medical professionals’ competencies in Canada must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and learners.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine continues to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations to align with our new Blueprint and to better address patient population health issues and psychosocial aspects of care;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials, including modules, videos, orientation and preparatory examinations for convenient online access anytime, anywhere.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

 

Eligibility changes to the NAC Examination
The introduction of a more flexible and internationally delivered Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part I in the spring of 2019 will see several complementary eligibility changes to the National Assessment Collaboration (NAC) Examination. These modifications will support candidates, provide more flexibility and enhance fairness as we approach this transition in our assessments’ evolution.

The introduction of a more flexible and internationally delivered Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part I in the spring of 2019 will see several complementary eligibility changes to the National Assessment Collaboration (NAC) Examination. These modifications will support candidates, provide more flexibility and enhance fairness as we approach this transition in our assessments’ evolution.

Please note that we will be introducing the following eligibility requirements for the NAC Examination starting with the March 2018 session:

For international medical students and graduates: A pass on the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) will no longer be an eligibility requirement to apply to the NAC exam

International medical students and graduates will no longer be required to pass the MCCEE before they can apply to the NAC exam. Eligible candidates will be able to challenge the NAC exam first – or the MCCEE – in the order that they prefer, or even in the same month.

For all candidates taking the NAC exam

Candidates who obtain a pass (or fail) result on the NAC exam will be able to retake it, up to a maximum of three times.

Starting in March 2018, candidates retaking the exam will, however, have to skip a session before retaking it regardless of a pass or fail result. For example, a candidate taking the September 2018 NAC exam will be able to retake the exam, at the earliest, in September 2019, skipping the March 2019 session.

These new NAC exam eligibility requirements apply to all candidates and offer an enhanced opportunity for candidates to prepare for their next attempt.

Since the new criteria on “skipping” a session applies starting in 2018, candidates taking the September 2017 exam with a pass or fail result will be able to retake it if they so choose in March 2018.

Previously (since 2015): Candidates with a pass result could not retake the exam. The governance committee, the National Assessment Central Coordinating Committee (NAC3) has revisited this approach to take into consideration the competitive process candidates face when applying to residency.

For international medical students applying to the NAC exam

Formerly, students could challenge the NAC exam in September of their final medical school year, further to passing the MCCEE. The eligibility rules are now changing, given that candidates may now challenge the NAC exam first. As such, the eligibility rules now indicate that international medical students may take the NAC exam at the earliest within 12 months of their anticipated date of graduation.

For more information on these changes, please see our NAC exam Application and eligibility web page.

We will issue a reminder about these changes in the fall, prior to the application opening for the March 2018 NAC exam session.

 

May 2017

Why is the MCC making changes to the examinations?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices.

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes, and MCC will continue to model its approach to excellence in physician evaluation based on best practices.

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, our nation’s medical professionals’ competencies must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and learners.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine continues to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations to align with our new Blueprint and to better address patient population health issues and psychosocial aspects of care;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials, including modules, videos, orientation and preparatory examinations for convenient online access anytime, anywhere.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

Practice test pilots
Report on the practice test pilots recently conducted and next piloting opportunity for Canadian graduating medical students (3rd and 4th year): Thank you to the 2,000+ students from across Canada who participated in MCC’s Multiple-Choice Question Practice Test (March/April 2017) - valuable feedback was gathered. Another cross-Canada piloting activity (also free for participants) will be offered with a Clinical Decision Making and Multiple-Choice Question focus in March/April 2018. Practice test pilots as well as ongoing consultations and Q&A sessions at key conferences are among the many ways that MCC continually gathers candidate and stakeholder input to inform examination planning and content, including creating additional candidate support tools and products.

Report on the practice test pilots recently conducted and next piloting opportunity for Canadian graduating medical students (3rd and 4th year): Thank you to the 2,000+ students from across Canada who participated in MCC’s Multiple-Choice Question Practice Test (March/April 2017) - valuable feedback was gathered. Another cross-Canada piloting activity (also free for participants) will be offered with a Clinical Decision Making and Multiple-Choice Question focus in March/April 2018. Practice test pilots as well as ongoing consultations and Q&A sessions at key conferences are among the many ways that MCC continually gathers candidate and stakeholder input to inform examination planning and content, including creating additional candidate support tools and products.

About the practice test pilots* conducted in March/April 2017 (Multiple-Choice questions focus):

  • MCC engaged graduating medical students (3rd and 4th year) in the delivery of a Multiple-Choice Question self-administered practice test;

  • The pilot was scheduled from March 20-April 13, 2017 and was offered for free to universities and students; and

  • Fifteen universities provided laboratory space, computer seats for students, and proctors to simulate a true examination.


Overall experience and outcomes:

  • More than 2,000 students participated across Canada;

  • Data was collected on the performance of 384 newly created items/questions;

  • While there were isolated technical issues and one contingency planning incident (one venue experienced a fire alarm), overall this was a highly successful initiative. Our thanks to participants for your patience as we worked swiftly to correct any problems. We have logged lessons learned and will have a new user-friendly platform to deliver next year’s pilot activity;

  • Examples of student feedback include:
    “Overall, very helpful to go through this and get a sense of what the exam will be like”
    “Thanks for offering this practice test”
    “Great preparation for the MCCQE Part I”
    “Was easy to use, straight forward, clear on how to maneuver”

  • This activity will help launch three new Multiple-Choice Questions Practice Tests in January 2018 (fee-based), with more to follow in 2019.


Piloting opportunity for graduating medical students - 3rd and 4th year (Clinical Decision Making and Multiple-Choice question focus, spring 2018):

  • MCC will be offering another free piloting activity across Canada from March 6 to April 6, 2018 for Canadian graduating medical students (3rd and 4th year);

  • The focus will be Multiple-Choice Questions and Clinical Decision Making cases.


Why are we doing practice test pilots?

  • Our primary goal was to collect data on newly created Multiple-Choice Questions to update the MCC Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part I preparatory products for 2018 and 2019. These future preparatory products will provide Canadian and international medical students and graduates with high quality practice tests available to them when preparing to write the MCCQE Part I; and

  • MCC wants to ensure that the quality of new candidate support tools and products follow the current content development processes of the MCCQE Part I as well as the new Blueprint starting in 2018.


Next steps:

  • MCC will be reaching out to universities shortly to sign-up for the spring 2018 practice test pilots.


*Please go to “Tests” in our Glossary to source the definition for “Practice Tests”

Additional announcements
MCC Examinations — Test Security: Preserving the integrity and security of the entire examination process and protecting examination content are critical to the MCC as an assessment body that has earned Canadians’ trust. All candidates taking an MCC examination must be aware of their legal and professional responsibilities prior to taking the exam.

MCC Examinations — Test Security: Preserving the integrity and security of the entire examination process and protecting examination content are critical to the MCC as an assessment body that has earned Canadians’ trust. All candidates taking an MCC examination must be aware of their legal and professional responsibilities prior to taking the exam. Applicants, test takers and potential applicants and anyone interested in test security are encouraged to click here for updated information.

 

April 2017

Why is the MCC process for conducting exams changing?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, our nation’s medical professionals’ competencies must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and students.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine is continued to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations and aligning them to our new Blueprint;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

Updates to the Objectives for the Qualifying Examinations
Revisions to the MCC’s Objectives: With the upcoming changes to the Blueprint for the Medical Council of Canada’s Qualifying Examinations starting in 2018, the following revisions have been made to the MCC’s Objectives. The Objectives describe the attributes expected of medical graduates entering supervised and independent practice in Canada, and can be used by candidates preparing for MCC examinations as well as by educators and medical assessment organizations in Canada and around the world.

Revisions to the MCC’s Objectives: With the upcoming changes to the Blueprint for the Medical Council of Canada’s Qualifying Examinations starting in 2018, the following revisions have been made to the MCC’s Objectives. The Objectives describe the attributes expected of medical graduates entering supervised and independent practice in Canada, and can be used by candidates preparing for MCC examinations as well as by educators and medical assessment organizations in Canada and around the world.

The Objectives serve as MCC’s guide when developing questions for the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE), the National Assessment Collaboration (NAC) examination and the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part I and Part II.

Why are we doing this?

  • Revisions to the MCC Objectives ensure that they are aligned with the newly approved examination blueprints.


Detailed information on the Blueprint project can be found here

How are the MCC Objectives developed?

The Objectives are organized by physician role as defined by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons’ CanMEDS (Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists) framework. This includes the roles of communicator, collaborator, health advocate, leader/manager, scholar, professional and medical expert. The CanMEDS framework is used extensively in Canada and is recognized worldwide.

Using the Objectives as a study guide

The Objectives are also organized by clinical presentation and diagnoses, each with learning objectives that set out what is expected of a Canadian physician. When preparing for the MCC Qualifying Examination, each role and clinical presentation/diagnosis can be reviewed with a careful read of the related key and enabling objectives.

To assist you in identifying the specific revisions made to the MCC Objectives, we have consolidated several tracking lists for your information. The lists have been separated into the following three categories: New Objectives, Revised Objectives and Deleted Objectives.

New results release dates for MCCQE Part I and for the MCCQE Part II—Effective 2018
New MCCQE Part I and MCCQE Part II results release dates will take effect in 2018: Please be advised that for the spring 2018 MCCQE Part I, the planned results date will be in July 2018; for the fall 2018 MCCQE Part II, the results release will be in January 2019.

New MCCQE Part I and MCCQE Part II results release dates will take effect in 2018: Please be advised that for the spring 2018 MCCQE Part I, the planned results date will be in July 2018; for the fall 2018 MCCQE Part II, the results release will be in January 2019.

Why are we doing this?

  • The new results release dates are linked to the launch of the new exams, and the time and attention required to conduct and complete a full standard-setting exercise following each exam.


Impact:

  • In some cases, postgraduate programs require their incoming residents to provide MCCQE Part I results. For those programs who have this requirement, please be advised of the change in timing for the planned results release for the spring 2018 MCCQE Part I (to July 2018), in order to reorient or change the timeline of this requirement for this session.

  • Candidates who are planning on taking the fall 2018 MCCQE Part II should be aware of the change in timing for the release of their results, especially if they must submit their results to other medical organizations before the end of 2018.

Publication of Test Specifications for the MCCQE Part II
Test Specifications for the MCCQE Part II: Following the publication of MCCQE Part I test specifications, the specifications for the MCCQE Part II have been posted, detailing the content weightings across the two Blueprint categories: physician activities and dimensions of care.

Test Specifications for the MCCQE Part II: Following the publication of MCCQE Part I test specifications, the specifications for the MCCQE Part II have been posted, detailing the content weightings across the two Blueprint categories: physician activities and dimensions of care.

Of note: The test specifications will refer to content weightings for the MCCQE Part I starting in spring 2018, and content weightings for the MCCQE Part II starting in fall 2018.

Additional announcements
MCC Business Session at CCME: Monday, May 1, 2017 in Winnipeg, Manitoba: The MCC is proud to take part in the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). CCME attendees are encouraged to attend the MCC’s Business Session on Monday, May 1 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. (local time/CST) at the Delta Hotel (Charleswood B Room) for the latest Assessment Evolution information and updates.

MCC Business Session at CCME: Monday, May 1, 2017 in Winnipeg, Manitoba: The MCC is proud to take part in the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). CCME attendees are encouraged to attend the MCC’s Business Session on Monday, May 1 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. (local time/CST) at the Delta Hotel (Charleswood B Room) for the latest Assessment Evolution information and updates.

Please extend this invitation to registered and prospective CCME attendees.

On Monday, May 1, 2017, we invite you to attend our business session, titled: The times they are a’changing. In this session, we will be reviewing the following topics:

  • Upcoming changes to the MCC's exam program and the communications activities that will support this evolution;

  • Previewing our new candidate score reports; and

  • Reviewing the results of the university pilot activity of the new multiple-choice question tests.


We will also be highlighting the existing candidate orientation tools and will discuss the additional preparatory materials that will be available.

MCC Speakers:

  • Dr. Ian Bowmer, Executive Director

  • Ms. Jessica Hertzog-Grenier, Director of Communications

  • Dr. André De Champlain, Director of Psychometrics and Assessment Services

  • Ms. Ingrid De Vries, Associate Director of the Evaluation Bureau


Date/Time: Monday, May 1, 2017 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. (local time/CST)

Location: Delta Hotel, Charleswood B Room

March 2017

Why is the MCC process for conducting exams changing?
Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

Canadians are living healthier and longer lives. And Canada now has the most diverse population of any country in the world. The delivery of care is adapting rapidly to keep pace with global changes.

As the delivery of health care to Canadians evolves, our nation’s medical professionals’ competencies must reflect the reality of medical practice and the current health-care needs of Canadians.

Modifications to MCC exams are required to modernize and streamline the exam experience for candidates. These modifications are an extensive undertaking, and have involved in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the medical community, including medical professionals, medical educators and students.

The following measures are being enacted to ensure that medicine is continued to be practised safely and effectively:

  • Revising examinations and aligning them to our new Blueprint;

  • Increasing testing frequency; and

  • Creating additional preparatory materials.


These steps are part of the MCC’s commitment to Canadians—to deliver the highest level of medical care through excellence in the evaluation of physicians.

 

March 2017 announcements: Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part I and its delivery in 2018
Exam delivery by MCC will continue to take place at current sites in 2018, and broaden in 2019 when we move to a vendor-delivered model: It will continue to be business as usual with exam delivery continuing at faculty and some private sites in 2018. We plan to introduce the vendor-delivered model in all Canadian cities where the examination is currently delivered, and internationally starting in spring 2019.

Exam delivery by MCC will continue to take place at current sites in 2018, and broaden in 2019 when we move to a vendor-delivered model: It will continue to be business as usual with exam delivery continuing at faculty and some private sites in 2018. We plan to introduce the vendor-delivered model in all Canadian cities where the examination is currently delivered, and internationally starting in spring 2019.

Why are we doing this?

  • This will ensure continuity in the short term and ensure broad access for candidates, especially for the spring examination window, when most candidates take the MCCQE Part I.

  • In 2019, the shift to a vendor-delivered model will provide more opportunities to take the MCCQE Part I.

Changes to the candidate exam experience starting in 2018 include:
A longer multiple-choice component, language selection at the start of the exam, and the ability to flag questions during the multiple-choice component and return to those questions at any point during the multiple-choice component portion of the exam.

A longer multiple-choice component, language selection at the start of the exam, and the ability to flag questions during the multiple-choice component and return to those questions at any point during the multiple-choice component portion of the exam.

The new exam structure will see a longer multiple-choice component (four hours) and a shorter clinical decision making component (3.5 hours). Currently, candidates have 3.5 hours to complete the multiple-choice component portion of the exam, and four hours for the clinical decision making component.

Why are we doing this?

  • The multiple-choice component portion was increased to be able to test more competencies in the required content areas.


Candidates will be required to make their language choice at the start of their exam on exam day, and then take the exam in one language; the language choice cannot be changed throughout the exam, and the toggling feature between English and French questions during the exam will no longer be available.

Why are we doing this?

  • Our analyses showed minimal usage of the toggling feature by candidates.

  • This change is also based on input from stakeholders, including medical educators, who have asked that their candidates take the exam in a single language.

  • The introduction of enhanced quality assurance measures for both language versions of the examination has made the need to toggle obsolete.

  • As well, the time spent toggling between language versions presented a potential risk for candidates of not completing the examination.

  • We are introducing this change in 2018, to align with how the exam will be offered at vendor operated sites in 2019.


Candidates will have the ability to flag questions during the multiple-choice question component, and return to those questions at any point during the multiple-choice question portion of the exam. As is currently the case, candidates will continue to be able to flag clinical decision making (CDM) questions and go back to the flagged CDM items at any point during the CDM component of the exam.

Why are we doing this?

  • This is being done to enhance the exam experience for candidates and align with how the exam will be delivered by the vendor starting in 2019.


 

March 2017: Additional Announcements
Limits to number of exam attempts for MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018: As you may be aware, limits will be introduced to the number of times candidates can take the MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018.

Limits to number of exam attempts for MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018: As you may be aware, limits will be introduced to the number of times candidates can take the MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II starting in 2018.

Beginning in January 2018, candidates may apply and take the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I and Part II a maximum of four times each. A one-year waiting period will be required between the third and fourth attempts. After four attempts, in exceptional personal circumstances, the candidate can request that the Central Examination Committee (CEC) grant them special permission to make a fifth attempt.

Exam attempts before 2018 will not count towards the limit; the count starts in 2018. If candidates receive a result of “no standing” because, for example, they fell ill during the exam, this will not count as an attempt. However, failing or a status of “denied standing” will be considered attempts.

This policy, put forward by the MCC’s Central Examination Committee (CEC) and approved by the Council last September, ensures fairness for candidates who are unlikely to be successful after numerous exam attempts, and prevents undue content exposure.